TROUT FISHING in the Delaware River -Catskill Country!


Delaware’s West Branch Gets 14,000 New Trout                                                                                    

April 10, 2012

The west branch of the Delaware River received a huge shipment of brown trout on Friday. Trucks from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Catskill Hatchery arrived in Walton shortly after 10 a.m. and brought the hatchery fish to numerous locations, on five sections of the river, from there up-river to Hobart.

If you live in the east then the Upper Delaware is for you.  The river’s substantial main stem is formed by the merger of the East and West Branch in the small town of Hancock. The Upper Delaware River is located on the New York and Pennsylvania border, and is said by many to be the best wild trout fishery in the East.  Both the East Branch and the West Branch originate in the Catskill Mountains where they join to create the scenic Delaware River.  These three rivers are a fly fishers paradise where wild trout test the skills of all levels of anglers.

Since both branches are tailwater, temperatures remain cool year-round (a rarity in the east) and aquatic insect life abounds.  These traits hold true for both branches as well as about 30 miles of the main stem (down to Calicoon).  The only exception is the lower part of the East Branch, which warms considerably in summer (in general, the West Branch is colder than the East).   All three sections provide fine fishing, with the biggest fish in the main stem.  As for scenery, the surrounding softly contoured mountains that are common in the east add a welcoming touch.  Conveniently, the river is no more than 150 miles northwest of New York City.

The river itself varies in character.  After dropping down some rapids below the dam, the upper West Branch flattens out and flows around modest islands, which gradually disappear and yield to long, wide pools interrupted by shallow riffles.  The West Branch is dominated by browns, with some rainbows and brookies to be caught, and much of it can be waded.  The East Branch is flat, slow and cold in its upper stretches above Shinhopple, not unlike a spring creek.  Here, you are better off in a boat, due to the thick weeds that form in the summer.  Fish in this branch range from brookies in the upper stretch to heavy browns further down as the water warms.  At Shinhopple, it drops down a section of rapids.  The main branch is big trout habitat, with long, deep pools up to 1/2 mile long, riffles, large boulders and steep drop-offs where the river runs up against wooded ridges.  This area can be fished by shore or by boat; wading is possible, but can be tricky.

ANGLER NOTES:                                                                   

Most of the river, especially the upper branches, is flanked by tall weeds which induce the trout to feed on terrestrials throughout the summer.  Add to this a plethora of heavy hatches, and you have yourself a veritable feast for the trout — and sometimes puzzling fishing for the angler.  Matching the hatch can be critical, and the fish are often finicky.  While there are too many hatches to mention, popular hatch patterns include Tan Caddis’ from mid-April through early September, Blue-Winged Olives from August through September, and Tricos from August through October.  Note that much of the access land is private and you can enter only with the landowner’s permission or with a guide who has already taken care of this for you.  Otherwise, enter from one of about 5 or 6 public access points (you can then wade up and down).  Paved roads line much of the river, and railroad tracks parallel the New York side of the main stem.  One benefit of the Delaware’s role as a border river between New York and Pennsylvania is that the states have a reciprocal fishing license agreement for the main stem.  One caveat on the fishing quality:  river flows depend greatly on dam releases.  Just be sure to call a local fly shop ahead of time to check the flows.  If flows are low, the trout tend to migrate upstream, especially into the West Branch of the beautiful Catskills!

 2012 Trout Stocking for Delaware County

Each year DEC releases over one million pounds of fish into more than 1,200 public streams, rivers, lakes and ponds across the state. These fish are stocked for two main purposes– to enhance recreational fishing and to restore native species to waters they formerly occupied. The DEC runs 12 fish hatcheries, each specializing in raising one or more species of fish, including brook trout, brown trout, rainbow trout, lake trout, steelhead, chinook salmon, coho salmon, landlocked salmon, walleye, muskellunge and tiger muskellunge.

The following listing reflects the anticipated number of yearling and older trout to be stocked into listed waters during spring 2012. Actual numbers and stocking times may vary depending on fish availability and weather conditions. The fish are stocked with help from County Federated Sportsmen.

Delaware County, DEC Region 4

Water

Town

Number

Date

Species

Size (inches)

Beaver Kill Colchester 1860 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Beaver Kill Colchester 1150 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Beaver Kill Colchester 1075 April Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Beaver Kill Colchester 2310 May Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Beaver Kill Colchester 1860 May – June Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Big Pond Andes 250 Spring Rainbow Trout 8.5 – 9.5 inches
Big Pond Andes 220 Spring Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Cannonsville Reservoir Deposit and Tompkins 6650 May Brown Trout 8.5 – 9.5 inches
Carrs Creek Sidney 440 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Charlotte Creek Davenport 300 April Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Charlotte Creek Davenport 4560 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Charlotte Creek Davenport 1070 May Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River East Branch Colchester 400 April Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Delaware River East Branch Colchester 370 May Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Delaware River East Branch Middletown 3200 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River East Branch Middletown 750 May Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River East Branch Middletown 500 May – June Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Delaware River East Branch Middletown, Roxbury 710 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River East Branch Middletown, Roxbury 180 May Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River East Branch Middletown, Roxbury 50 May – June Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Delaware River East Branch Roxbury 270 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River East Branch Roxbury 90 May Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River East Branch Roxbury 50 May – June Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Delaware River West Branch Delhi 640 April Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Delaware River West Branch Delhi 4880 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River West Branch Delhi 1150 May Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River West Branch Hamden, Walton 480 April Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Delaware River West Branch Hamden, Walton 4080 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River West Branch Hamden, Walton 1020 May Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River West Branch Harpersfield 280 April Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Delaware River West Branch Harpersfield 1860 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River West Branch Harpersfield 440 May Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River West Branch Kortright 800 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Delaware River West Branch Kortright 270 May Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Launt Pond Tompkins 670 April Brook Trout 8 – 9 inches
Little Delaware River Bovina 350 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Little Delaware River Delhi 350 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Little Pond Andes 200 Spring Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Little Pond Andes 90 Spring Brown Trout 8.5 – 9.5 inches
Little Pond Andes 200 Spring Rainbow Trout 8.5 – 9.5 inches
Mud Pond Colchester 90 Spring Brown Trout 8.5 – 9.5 inches
Mud Pond Colchester 300 Spring Rainbow Trout 8.5 – 9.5 inches
Ouleout Creek Franklin 2220 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Ouleout Creek Franklin 150 April Brown Trout 12 -15 inches
Ouleout Creek Franklin 800 May Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Ouleout Creek South Fork Franklin 580 April Brown Trout 8 – 9 inches
Pepacton Reservoir Colchester 8870 Spring Brown Trout 8.5 – 9.5 inches

To own your piece of the Catskill’s by the Delaware River, call “The Land Expert”, Kellie Place at Century 21. 607-434-5263.


Kellie M. Place
, “The Land Expert”
“Upstate New York’s Real Estate Development Expert” 
“Multi-Million Dollar Top Producer”
 CENTURY 21 Chesser Realty        607-434-5263 – cell
607-432-7653 Ext. 102 – Oneonta office
607-746-7653 – Delhi office
 kmplace02@aol.com

http://www.century21upstatenewyork.com

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About Kellie M. Place Century 21 Upstate NY

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson UPSTATE NY'S REAL ESTATE & LAND EXPERT "MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR TOP PRODUCER" Specializing in LAND, RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, MULTI-FAMILY/INVESTMENT PROPERTIES AND NATURAL GAS LAND ACQUISITIONS. VOTED "BEST of the BEST" REALTOR IN PEOPLE'S CHOICE AWARDS! WINNER OF THE QUALITY SERVICE AWARD! HOT POINTS: Upstate NY's Real Estate Development Expert * 30 Yrs of Development/Planning Experience * Multi-Million Dollar Top Producer * 30 Yr /Chairperson of Oneonta Planning Commission * Leading Agent with Proven Results * Knowledge of Upstate NY Communities * Aggressive Marketing with International Exposure * Member Otsego County Chamber of Commerce * Proudly serving Otsego, Delaware, Chenango, Madison, Schohari and Broome Counties. My name is Kellie Place and I am a Multi-Million Dollar TOP Producer with CENTURY 21. I serve as the Chairperson of the Oneonta Planning Commission of which I have been a member for over 30 years. Having worked with developers and engineers on both sides gives me an edge above other agents in all types of real estate. Co-Founder and Director of Administration of the internationally renowned New York Summer Music Festival at Oneonta State College. Chairperson of the Mayor's Arts & Events Task Force. Executive Board Member of the Community Arts Network of Oneonta. Co-founder and Executive Director of the Calcio Soccer Club and a member of the Broome County Soccer Association. I have coached youth soccer and hockey for over 20 years. I was the recipient of the "Volunteer of the Year" Award at the National Soccer Hall of Fame Co-Founder of the grassroots organization, Oneonta Community Alliance for Youth. Serve on the Otsego County Chamber of Commerce Business Action Committee as well as active in local, county and state politics. In short, an active community member that has...... "Served the Community for over 30 years!"
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One Response to TROUT FISHING in the Delaware River -Catskill Country!

  1. flyfishstories says:

    Interesting I didn’t know they were still stocking the West Branch of the Delaware. I knew they stock quite a bit above the Cannonsville Reservoir.

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